Abstract

Research Article

Prevalence and seasonal variations of eggs of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of goats from smallholder farms in Mozambique

Alsácia Atanásio-Nhacumbe* and Carlos Francisco Sitoe

Published: 23 July, 2019 | Volume 3 - Issue 1 | Pages: 023-029

A survey was carried out to determine the prevalence and seasonal variations of eggs of gastrointestinal nematodes in goats in four provinces of Mozambique, from November 2016 to October 2017 in Tete and Cabo Delgado, and from November 2016 to October 2018 in Maputo and Gaza. In each province, flocks were selected from both lowlands, located within the valleys of the rivers, and uplands which are located outside the valleys. Faecal samples were collected at monthly intervals to monitor faecal egg counts fluctuations. The modified McMaster technique was used for quantitative analysis of nematode eggs and for detecting cestode eggs in faecal samples. The sedimentation technique for detecting trematode eggs in faecal samples was used. A total of 2 703 samples were examined for nematode eggs and 2 587 for trematode eggs. Faecal examination indicated that between 18% and 100% of goats sampled were infected with gastro-intestinal nematodes. The prevalence varied according to the season of the year and the ecological conditions. The highest prevalence and worm egg counts were recorded at about the peak of the rainy season. Strongyloides papillosus, Calicophoron spp., Fasciola spp. and Schistosoma mattheei eggs were also found. Moniezia expansa and Moniezia benedeni eggs were found in all the four study areas but its prevalence was low and irregular. Based on the results of this study, which showed a clear seasonal pattern, strategic anthelmintic medications to effectively control helminth infections in goats in the different ecological zones of Mozambique are suggested.

Read Full Article HTML DOI: 10.29328/journal.ivs.1001016 Cite this Article Read Full Article PDF

Keywords:

Prevalence; Seasonal variations; Gastrointestinal nematodes; Goats; Smallholder farms

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